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Yet Another Threat To Kill & Harm: Trump Hates Animals*

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Yet Another Threat To Kill & Harm: Trump Hates Animals*

An independent agency dedicated solely to the protection of sea-dwelling mammals

– the Marine Mammal Commission –

is another one of the vital structures that are currently threatened by Donald Trump’s planned budget.

*unless they can make him some money. 

https://www.mmc.gov/about-the-commission/our-mission/

https://www.mmc.gov/about-the-commission/our-mission/

This federal agency protects the marine mammals living in and on the seas, like whales, dolphins, porpoises, seals, sea lions, sea otters, manatees, walruses, and polar bears. It was charged by the Marine Mammal Protection Act in 1972 and, since then, has provided vital science-based oversight of domestic and international policies and actions of federal agencies. It also looks into how humans impact the lives of marine mammals.

Throughout the 45 years of its existence, the agency has done a great deal of much-needed work to research marine mammals and spread knowledge about different species, helping us understand these fascinating creatures better. As highlighted by a petition on Care2, it also launched many collaborative efforts which have dramatically reduced the deaths of marine animals from things such as ghost fishing nets, ship and boat strikes, loss of habitat, and 

Trump & His Administration Are Idiots

Now, however, the President is worried that the agency, with its budget of just over three million dollars, puts a strain on the 1.1 trillion dollar budget of the U.S…

With just three commissioners and a very small staff, Marine Mammal Commission is obviously not a source of any potential financial difficulties for the country.

Serious difficulties, however, will be faced by the marine mammals if the precious work of the agency is stopped.

 

The Oil Companies, Again

The elimination of the commission would be great news to the offshore oil industry, the fishing industry, and simply everyone who thinks of marine mammals, not as living creatures that have to be respected and protected, but rather inconvenient things that thwart their quick profit.

It may feel like signing petitions is a very small thing – and surely one that we do a lot of, especially in the past months – but it is also the easiest action that each of us can and should do to make our stance clear.

 Click here to sign the petition to fully fund the Marine Mammal Commission for 2018 and beyond!

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How Would You Break Up A Dog Fight?

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How Would You Break Up A Dog Fight?

Do You Know the Best Way to Break Up a Dogfight and Come Out Unscathed?

 

Story at-a-glance

  • The natural response of dog guardians is to try to break up a dogfight before one or both dogs are injured, however, it can be a dangerous proposition to attempt to stop dogs from fighting
     
  • There is no cookie cutter approach to breaking up a dogfight that works in every situation or with every dog. It’s up to each individual to decide if the risk of intervening outweighs the potential for injury
     
  • There are many methods people employ to try to separate two fighting dogs, many of which involve distracting one or both animals
     
  • The best way to prevent aggressive behavior in your own dog is to identify and address it while he’s still a puppy

By Dr. Becker

If you’re a dog lover and see two dogs fighting, your natural response is to want to physically separate them before someone gets hurt.

And this is especially true when one or both dogs belong to you.

However, as many, many people who have come before you will attest, it can be very risky business to try to break up a serious dogfight.

Even though they evolved as pack animals and are genetically programmed to get along in social groups, unfortunately, dogs do occasionally fight. When it happens, it can be a harrowing, dangerous situation for both the dueling dogs and their humans.

Don't Yell or Scream

The first response of many people who encounter a dogfight is to scream at the top of their lungs to try to put a halt to the action. If this doesn’t work - and it usually doesn’t, and can even cause an escalation in the fighting - the next reflexive move is to try to reach between the dogs to rescue the one who’s getting the worst of it.

Don't Try to Separate Them

Attempts to physically separate fighting dogs very often results in serious injury to the human, sometimes inflicted by his or her own dog – which only makes a bad situation worse.

However, it’s not realistic to expect a dog lover to simply stand back and watch a vicious dogfight play out. So what’s a person to do if and when a fight breaks out?

The Spit-and-Drool Match vs. the Serious Dogfight

According to acclaimed dog behaviorist, the late Dr. Sophia Yin, most fights between unfamiliar dogs or first fights between dogs who are housemates are simply “spit and drool matches” even if there’s a lot of noise and fur flying. If either dog goes further, it’s typically a quick bite-and-release.1

Go For the Tail, Not the Head

The major concern in these situations is to get the dogs separated without being bitten, when means you must avoid grabbing the head or neck area of either animal. According to Dr. Yin, the safest method is to grab the dogs by the rear end and quickly pull them away from each other.

Push Away, DON'T Kick

Alternatively, and depending on where you’re standing or how fast the dogs are changing position, you can place your foot on the rib cage of one of the dogs and push him away. This is NOT a kick to the dog - it’s simply using your foot against his side as leverage to push him away.

This approach is much safer than bending over either dog while trying to push them apart with your hands. It also leaves your hands free to get control of the other dog if possible.

If you have dog leashes close by, looping the leash under the back two legs of both dogs and pulling them apart from their back ends can also work.

Other Methods of Breaking Up a Dogfight

Other methods of separating fighting dogs involve distractions, including:

  • Placing a board or other object between them
  • Spraying the dogs with water
  • Banging a noisy object near them; blowing an air horn
  • Using an aversive spray like citronella (brand name Direct Stop™)
  • Tossing a blanket over one or both dogs
  • Quickly inviting one of the dogs to go for a walk or a ride in the car
  • Lightly popping one or both dogs on the top of the head with a newspaper or magazine
  • Ringing the doorbell or opening a door to the outside (if you have a fenced in backyard)
     

Dr. Yin stresses that in all cases it’s important to avoid taking any action that may cause the dogs to redirect aggression to you .

It’s also important to remember that no technique for breaking up a dogfight is foolproof, and all involve a certain degree of risk to both the dogs and the humans who try to intervene. It’s up to you to understand the risks, weigh the odds, and decide if the risks outweigh the potential for injury.

It's Not Over 'Til It's Over

Once the dogs are separated, it’s important to pay attention to whether one or both dogs want to keep battling, whether they calm down right away, or try to get away. If one dog clearly wants to keep fighting, he’s in need of intensive positive behavior modification training to prevent fights in the future.

Low-level tussles can progress to more dangerous fights in dogs with undiagnosed or unchecked aggression. Also keep in mind that most dogfights can be prevented by attentive guardians who notice when one dog is tense around another, and take immediate action to separate the dogs.

Signs of Interdog Aggression

Interdog aggression becomes a problem when a dog behaves aggressively with dogs in the same household, or more commonly, with unfamiliar dogs.

Some people consider a dog’s aggression toward strange dogs to be normal, however, without appropriate intervention and training, some dogs can become disproportionately aggressive due to learning and/or genetic factors.

Interdog aggression is more common in intact male dogs, and dogs of the same gender. The problem typically becomes apparent either when the dog hits puberty (from 6 to 9 months of age), or when he becomes socially mature at 18 to 36 months.

Common signs of inter-dog aggression include:

  • Growling
  • Crouching
  • Lip biting
  • Tucking the tail
  • Snapping
  • Licking the lips
  • Lunging toward another dog
  • Backing away
  • Fearful or submissive postures

In the case of interdog aggression between dogs in the same household, there are usually preliminary signs that indicate one dog is attempting to exert social control over another. For example, a dog may stare at and block the other dog’s entrance into a room.

The best way to curb a dog’s aggressive behavior is to nip it in the bud while he’s still a puppy.

 

SOCIALIZE-YOUR-ACTIVE-PUPPY.jpg

Recognizing Aggressive Behavior in Your Puppy

During normal play, a puppy may play bow (lower his head while raising his rear end), present his front end or side to you, hold the front part of his body up, wag his tail, zip back and forth, give high-pitched barks and growls, and spontaneously ambush you or another animal in the house.

These behaviors are fun to watch and participate in with your puppy, unless they become too extreme.

Little twists on normal play that can indicate a problem include:

  • Prolonged, deep growling
  • Fixed gaze
  • Stiff posture
  • Aggression that is situational or stimulus-dependent rather than spontaneous

These aggressive behaviors may stem from fear, territoriality, conflict, or pain and should be evaluated immediately by you, your veterinarian, and/or a veterinary behaviorist.

How to Discourage Aggressive Puppy Play

In order to prevent a puppy with aggressive tendencies from growing into an aggressive adult dog, your puppy must learn how to play appropriately, and you can help him in the following ways:

  • Sidetrack bad behavior. Keep a toy on hand that will grab your pup’s attention as soon as he engages in inappropriate behavior. Offer him appropriate toys to mouth and chew on before he has a chance to make bad choices.
     
  • Give verbal cues followed by an action. If your puppy is biting too hard during play, loudly say “Ouch,” and stop playing immediately.
     
  • Give a time-out. If your pup isn’t responding to your attempts to stop a behavior, put him and a few toys in a separate room or his crate until he settles down.
     
  • Don’t engage in aggressive roughhousing or play. Some puppies have a low arousal threshold and can become very assertive, quickly. Avoid rigorous or intense play with these puppies, which can escalate into more mouthy play on their part, or nipping behaviors that are difficult to shut down.
     
  • Use leashes and head halters. You can use a leash indoors as well as outside to quickly stop a behavior. Don’t yank or jerk the leash – simply use it when necessary to gain control over the situation.

Head halters sometimes provide a more natural sense of control than collars do, but it’s important to match the collar, harness, or halter to the personality and training needs of each puppy.

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Summer Disasters for Your Pets: Quick List

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Summer Disasters for Your Pets: Quick List

Summer has long been a time for vacations, cookouts and pool parties. When the heat turns up, the dangers to pets increase too.

Summer has long been a time for vacations, cookouts and pool parties. When the heat turns up, the dangers to pets increase too. To keep your dog, cat and other furry friends safe, make sure you are prepared. We interviewed Dr. Elizabeth Rozanski, DVM, DACVIM, DACVECC, Associate Professor of Clinical Sciences at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine and Section Head for Emergency Medicine at the Foster Hospital for Small Animals, for tips on preventing accidents and safeguarding your pet during the summer months.

Ticks

Ticks

With all of the time your pet will be spending outdoors, one of the biggest dangers is ticks. During the summer, Dr. Rozanski recommends that you or your dog walker check your pet for ticks at least once a day and look thoroughly after walks or trips through wooded areas. "Ticks can be harder to find on thicker coat dogs," she warns. "And dogs are often more affected than cats are."

What should you do if you find a tick? Look through the ASPCA's guide: How to Remove a Tick from Your Pet. Once it's removed (usually with tweezers), "try to save it in an airtight container," suggests Dr. Rozanski. "Then ask your vet if you should bring it in for testing." Ticks carry a number of diseases, including Lyme disease, but symptoms are often hard to spot. Dogs may be tired or feverish, or become lame. So also talk to your vet ahead of time about effective tick medication, and only use products that are made for your type of pet.

 

Dehydration & Heatstroke

Dehydration & Heatstroke

Dehydration and heat stroke are very real threats when the dog days of summer are upon us. Animals should always have fresh, clean water available, whether it's summer or the dead of winter. Carry portable water bowls on walks and bring them on vacation or long car rides. Short-nosed dogs, like pugs, Japanese chins and bulldogs, darker-colored pets, animals that are overweight or ones that have thick coats (like Himalayan or Persian cats), are especially prone to heat stress. Watch out for these symptoms: 


Don't worry if your dog pants. "It's how they cool themselves," says Dr. Rozanski. "The hotter it is, the more they will pant." Other ways to cool your pup? Fans, ice packs, frozen treats, ice cubes, kiddie pools and sprinklers. Your kids and dog will have a blast. 

What should you do if you think your pet is dehydrated? "If they seem weak or off-balance, cool them with a hose or wet towels and get them to a veterinarian as quickly as possible," recommends Ronzanski.

  • Excess lethargy
  • Decreased urination
  • Dry gums
  • Refusal to eat
  • Sunken eyes
  • Decreased skin elasticity (Gently pinch your pet's skin near the shoulder up into the shape of a tent; if the skin is slow to snap back, your pet may be dehydrated.)
     
Pools & Water

Pools & Water

Despite what YouTube may tell us, cats and rabbits don't like to swim. "I believe most of the animals [in the videos] are not enjoying it," says Dr. Rozanski. And not all dogs have mastered the doggie paddle. Some may not like water and certain breeds like pugs and terriers may have trouble swimming. So before you bring Fido to the beach or pool, buy a flotation device (yes, dogs can wear floaties too!) to keep your pup safe. If you are planning a boating adventure with your dog this summer, make sure he doesn't jump overboard, which can be dangerous for animals. And never try to force your pet into the water. 

If you luck out and your pet enjoys splashing around, always rinse off after a swim. The chlorine, salt and bacteria in pools and lakes can be harmful. Animals should also have a shady area nearby where they can cool off and access to fresh water, as drinking salt water and pool water can cause health problems.

We have all done it.

We have all done it.

We have all been guilty of it. You leave the dog or cat in the car to run a quick errand inside a store. But in the summer months or if the temperature is above 65 degrees, stop this bad habit. "It's too great a risk to your dog's health and should not be done," warns Dr. Rozanski. So keep your pet safe and bring them with you.

 

Sorry, I can't handle snake pictures or pictures of bites. 

Sorry, I can't handle snake pictures or pictures of bites. 

More time spent outdoors means more potential encounters with slithering serpents. Many are harmless, but sometimes a snake's bite is worse than your dog's bark. Protect your pet (and the rest of your family) by keeping your yard tidy -- snakes love to hide and tall grass and piles of junk are perfect spots. 

Remind kids that if they see a snake -- no matter if it's poisonous or not - they should back away and leave it alone. "If your dog is inclined to chase wild animals, get him or her into the house until the animal goes away," advises Dr. Rozanski. 

If your cat is allowed to go outside, do a quick surveillance of your yard beforehand to make sure the coast is clear. Unfortunately, a cat or a small dog can be a perfect-size meal for some snakes. 

If a pet is bitten by a snake, its face and head will become swollen and "you should call your vet right away," urges Dr. Rozanski. 


 The ASPCA also has a guide on snake bite and safety prevention.

Bee stings

Bee stings

Buzz. Buzz. It may not be a pleasant sound to us, but it can cause your pet to investigate. And while curiosity may not kill the cat (or dog), it can get them stung. So what should you do? "Often -- nothing," says Dr. Rozanski. If there is a lot of swelling, call your vet who can suggest an office visit or prescribe an over-the-counter medicine. Some OTCs are harmful to pets though, so never dispense them on your own. 

And watch how your pet responds to any swelling. If they are very irritated, they may scratch the stung area, pulling out the fur. These "hot spots" make your pet look bald. Bring your pet to the vet right away if you notice this behavior or these spots.

If feels hot to you, its way too hot for them. 

If feels hot to you, its way too hot for them. 

Ever heard the expression, "It's so hot, you can fry an egg on the sidewalk"? Things like black pavement (or asphalt) can get very hot and can harm your pets' paws. "Think about what you're walking on," says Dr. Rozanski. "If you wouldn't like walking on it with bare feet, try to limit your dog's time on it too." 

Talk to your dog walker about what routes to avoid in the summer. Stay away from asphalt or rough pavement, pick softer routes and schedule walks for cooler times of the day. 

And what about booties? "If you think your dog will tolerate them, give them a try -- but many really don't like them," says Dr. Rozanski. Plus, common sense tricks, like walking in the shade, can replace the need for booties, so try that before paying for something your pup may not like.

Short haircuts all around. 

Short haircuts all around. 

Grooming is especially important in warmer weather. Brush your pet more often during the summer to get rid of excess or matted fur, which can weigh a pet down and contribute to overheating. And it depends on where you live and the type of animal you have, but "if they seem uncomfortable because of their thick coat, for example dogs may pant endlessly, consider taking them to a groomer," says Dr. Rozanski. Never cut too closely though, as a coat protects your pet from the harsh summer sun.

 

No scraps, chicken bones or chocolate. 

No scraps, chicken bones or chocolate. 

Everyone loves a cookout, especially your pet, who gets to feast on table scraps. But a little of this and a taste of that can be bad for pets--and not just for their waistlines. Some surprising foods, such as grapes, onions, garlic and raisins, can be toxic to dogs if consumed in large quantities and should stay off their menu. Grapes and raisins are safe for cats, but keep onions and garlic away from them, says Dr. Rozanski. Watch out for these BBQ favorites that can pose a problem for your pet.
 

And what about everything else on the table? "Table scraps and treats should be kept to less than 10 percent of a pet's diet," says Dr. Rozanski. Boneless chicken, hamburgers and hot dogs are okay, but limit them to small quantities. As you know, most pets eat anything and everything, so keep an eye on what they're indulging in.

Talk to any guests, especially kids, before summer parties. Politely remind them if your pet has a special diet, is allergic to anything or if there are any foods on the table that could cause a health problem. You want to enjoy the party too, not spend it looking after a pet with an upset stomach.

  • Barbeque: This slow-cooked delight can cause non-delightful diarrhea in dogs.
     
  • Corn on the Cob. Dogs often have difficultly digesting corn cobs and this barbeque staple can be a choking hazard.
     
  • Fruits with pits. Peaches, avocados and other pitted fruit can be choking hazards.
     
  • Food with bones: Squeaky bone that's a toy: great. Real bones in food: not so much. Even things like bone-in wings can be very dangerous for your pet, as they may splinter and hurt their GI system, sometimes even piercing their bowels. Avoid the emergency room by not feed your pet anything with bones.
     
  • Foods with toothpicks or skewers: An overlooked toothpick or splinter can pierce or make a hole in the intestines.
     
  • Ice cream: A little of any flavor is fine for most dogs. Try some, but it may not agree with all dogs, especially if they have sensitive stomachs. Just like people, some dogs can be lactose intolerant.
Keep summer fun for everyone!

Keep summer fun for everyone!

These dangers may sound scary, but a little preparation and watchful eye is all you need to take the heat off your summer.

Get more hot weather tips from the ASPCA.

Stephanie St. Martin @StephanieStM

 

 

 



Talk to your dog walker about what routes to avoid in the summer. Stay away from asphalt or rough pavement, pick softer routes and schedule walks for cooler times of the day. 

And what about booties? "If you think your dog will tolerate them, give them a try -- but many really don't like them," says Dr. Rozanski. Plus, common sense tricks, like walking in the shade, can replace the need for booties, so try that before paying for something your pup may not like.

  1. Extra fur
    Grooming is especially important in warmer weather. Brush your pet more often during the summer to get rid of excess or matted fur, which can weigh a pet down and contribute to overheating. And it depends on where you live and the type of animal you have, but "if they seem uncomfortable because of their thick coat, for example dogs may pant endlessly, consider taking them to a groomer," says Dr. Rozanski. Never cut too closely though, as a coat protects your pet from the harsh summer sun.
  2. BBQs and family cookouts
    Everyone loves a cookout, especially your pet, who gets to feast on table scraps. But a little of this and a taste of that can be bad for pets--and not just for their waistlines. Some surprising foods, such as grapes, onions, garlic and raisins, can be toxic to dogs if consumed in large quantities and should stay off their menu. Grapes and raisins are safe for cats, but keep onions and garlic away from them, says Dr. Rozanski. Watch out for these BBQ favorites that can pose a problem for your pet.
     

    And what about everything else on the table? "Table scraps and treats should be kept to less than 10 percent of a pet's diet," says Dr. Rozanski. Boneless chicken, hamburgers and hot dogs are okay, but limit them to small quantities. As you know, most pets eat anything and everything, so keep an eye on what they're indulging in.

    Talk to any guests, especially kids, before summer parties. Politely remind them if your pet has a special diet, is allergic to anything or if there are any foods on the table that could cause a health problem. You want to enjoy the party too, not spend it looking after a pet with an upset stomach.

    • Barbeque: This slow-cooked delight can cause non-delightful diarrhea in dogs.
    • Corn on the Cob. Dogs often have difficultly digesting corn cobs and this barbeque staple can be a choking hazard.
    • Fruits with pits. Peaches, avocados and other pitted fruit can be choking hazards.
    • Food with bones: Squeaky bone that's a toy: great. Real bones in food: not so much. Even things like bone-in wings can be very dangerous for your pet, as they may splinter and hurt their GI system, sometimes even piercing their bowels. Avoid the emergency room by not feed your pet anything with bones.
    • Foods with toothpicks or skewers: An overlooked toothpick or splinter can pierce or make a hole in the intestines.
    • Ice cream: A little of any flavor is fine for most dogs. Try some, but it may not agree with all dogs, especially if they have sensitive stomachs. Just like people, some dogs can be lactose intolerant.

These dangers may sound scary, but a little preparation and watchful eye is all you need to take the heat off your summer. Get more hot weather tips from the ASPCA.

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Big Animal Response Team BART

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Big Animal Response Team BART

Big Animal Rescue Truck (BART)

Animal Disaster Response Mobile Command Center

BART, Code 3 Associates’ Big Animal Rescue Truck, carries animal rescue and disaster response equipment and acts as the Mobile Command Center for our Riders on the Storm.

BART was designed with one goal in mind: to support and expand the ability of any agency or organization to effectively accomplish its mission of disaster or emergency response. It was specifically engineered to provide added resources to a devastated area, not to further deplete them.

BART remains stocked and ready to roll normally within two hours of an official deployment from the agency in charge. Our teams of qualified drivers can have BART practically anywhere in the continental U.S. and set up to support the local rescue efforts in 40 hours or less.

Tractor and Trailer
The tractor is a 2009 White Western Star with a 515 horsepower engine, which pulls a 1996 Kentucky 53-foot converted moving van. The sleeper attached to the tractor is a Double Eagle custom sleeper. BART’s overall length is 82 feet, with a loaded weight of 78,000 pounds.

Accommodations
BART can comfortably accommodate 11 team members in a zero resource environment for up to a week before needing to re-supply. BART’s accommodations include sleeping bunks, toilet/shower, sink, microwave, refrigerator and air conditioning/heating system.

Vet/Triage Center
The vet triage and examination center is intended to augment the capabilities of responding veterinary resources. It is equipped with:
• Fold-down stainless steel exam table
• Triage area’s own bank of 12 stainless steel cages
• Autoclave/sterilizer
• Surgical light and table
• A wide variety of medical, surgical and clinical supplies

Equipment and Supplies
BART contains an extensive inventory of equipment and supplies including:
• 4×4 support truck (rides within the trailer)
• Two-horse trailer (rides within the trailer)
• Three boats and motors for various uses
• Personal rescue equipment used for wildland fires, water rescue, low-angle rope and ice rescues
• 80 cages and carriers for companion animals
• Portable corrals for livestock and wildlife
• Humane animal traps and capture equipment
• Portable water tanks
• Large animal rescue glide system
• Items designed for safe search, rescue and care of all types of animal
• Perishable items, such as animal feed and medical supplies, that are stocked at time of deployment
• Two additional support trucks and stock trailers may accompany BART

Water and Power
BART has the capacity to carry 800 gallons of fresh water at a time. One tank is designated for the vet clinic and has a separate hot water heater to provide both hot and cold water to the clinic.BART has two generators, one on-board for power to the sleeper and trailer and one as a portable power source.We are only able to keep BART rolling through the generosity of those who support us; we receive no governmental support even though we are routinely called upon by jurisdictions all over the continental US and Canada. There are no fees charged for the first week for our disaster response and we do not solicit donations while on site; we are supported primarily through tax deductible donations outside of the disaster area. 

These folks are amazing, please visit their site and help if you can. They might be just who you need someday.......

website: http://code3associates.org/disaster-response/big-animal-rescue-truck-bart/

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See Animal Cruelty? Report It!

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See Animal Cruelty? Report It!

Report Animal Cruelty

It is our duty as responsible human beings to report animal abuse.

Hundreds of precious animals would be saved everyday if people would speak up - now is your chance. If you witness or even suspect animal abuse, please report it immediately to your local A.S.P.C.A, Police Department or Animal Control.

To find Humane Societies, Animal Shelters and Pet Adoption organizations in your area please click here.

Urge Your Elected Officials to Protect ALL Animals by Implementing Stronger Laws

It is equally as important to contact the elected officials in your area and ask them to support animal protection and to propose stronger laws in your state. Please use the links below to find and contact your elected officials: 

U.S. Senators
U.S. Representatives
State Governors
 

Animal Cruelty Is A Crime In Every State

Animal cruelty is a crime in every state in the US. If you witness or hear about animal abuse, animal neglect or animal fight, report it to your local or state police department. You should also contact your animal control agency, the SPCA and Humane Society. If it’s an emergency, call 911.

What Constitutes Cruelty

  • Neglect – denying an animal adequate food, water, shelter (a dog house) medical care (has apparent injuries that have not been treated), clean area, socialization (is the animal aggressive or timid when approached by owner), or chained up in a yard.
     
  • Violence – deliberately torturing, beating, mutilating an animal.
     
  • Crime - Almost all acts of violence or negligence to animals are punishable by law. Laws vary not only from state to state but from region to region.

Other types of Animal Abuse: 

If your area lacks the proper animal welfare agency, and your local authorities are not equipped to deal with animal cruelty cases, you can also email or call The HSUS and ask to speak with one of our experts about the suspected abuse.

Be sure to document the case as well as you can, with dates, times, specific details and, if possible, footage and photographs from a cell phone. All of these things can help appropriate agencies during any investigation they may do of the suspected cruelty.

Hoarding

Hoarding behavior often victimizes animals. Sufferers of a hoarding disorder may impose severe neglect on animals by housing far more than they are able to adequately take care of. Contact your local animal control agency if you find out about animal hoarding. Some animal hoarding situations can be more difficult than others to solve. What you can do »

Lack of veterinary care

Untreated wounds are a red flag that demand immediate attention; emaciation, scabs and hair loss can also be a sign of untreated diseases. If you can, alert the owner to the animal's condition and alert local authorities of suspected neglect as soon as possible.

Inadequate shelter

In extreme heat or cold temperatures can be deadly. It can seem daunting or unnecessary to report neglect for inadequate sheltering, but conditions can change quickly, causing suffering or even death of the animal. Contact a local animal control agency immediately if you see an animal in inadequate shelter and document the incident with a cell phone camera if possible.

Chained dogs

Dogs who are tethered continuously suffer tremendously, both from social isolation and exposure to predators and the elements. What you can do for chained dogs »

Abandonment

A startling number of animals die every year when people move out of their residences and simply leave the animals behind. Sometimes, an abandoned dog's barking or cat's howling can alert the neighbors, but it's wise to keep an eye on a recently vacated home, especially if the former residents moved suddenly. Companion animals kept in cages or tanks are often overlooked upon a residents’ sudden passing, and may suffer neglect as well. If you find or know of abandoned animals, contact your local animal control agency immediately.

Pets left in cars

Time is of the essence when reporting pets left in parked cars. Even if the outside temperature seems cool, these animals could be minutes away from death or irreversible organ damage. If you cannot locate the owner immediately, don’t be afraid to call local authorities, detailing your location and the make, model and license plate number of the vehicle the animal is inside. Learn more about pets in hot cars »  

Beating and physical abuse

If you witness direct physical violence to an animal, report the incident immediately to authorities. If you decide to intervene in any way, use your best judgement and do not become physically involved in the situation; remember, even well-intentioned actions could compromise the process of investigation into suspected abuse.

Animal fighting and organized cruelty

Organized cruelty, such as dogfighting, cockfighting and other bloodsports, is illegal in all 50 states, and is linked to other criminal activities such as human violence, gambling and drug distribution. If you hear about or witness events like these, immediately report them to the local authorities and the HSUS. 

These are just common examples of animal cruelty. Even if a case doesn’t fit neatly into these categories, take action if something feels off. In many cases, you may be the only chance an animal has at escaping cruelty or neglect.

Documentation

Get as much information as you can to give to the authorities. Document the incident with photos or videos of the location, animal(s) involved and surrounding area. Be as detailed as possible. Dates, times, circumstances and statements from other people who have witnessed the cruelty should be noted and related to the authorities.

Reporting Cruelty

Provide the authorities with written documentation and always keep a copy for yourself. Keep careful record of who you spoke with, date, content and outcome of discussion. Ask what action is planned.

When calling to report animal cruelty, be sure to include the following:

  1. Name of the person you believe is involved, if known.
  2. Is this person the owner of the animal(s)?
  3. Exact address and city where the animal is located. If you have a zip code it is helpful. If you do not have the precise address, give cross streets or accurate directions to the site.
  4. What type of animal? dog, cat, horse, etc.
  5. How many animals may be involved?
  6. What type of cruelty are you reporting? neglect, violence.
  7. Is it an owned animal(s) or a stray(s)?
  8. Be sure to leave your full name and contact information.

Follow-Up

Don’t assume the situation was addressed. Always follow-up with the officer in charge of the case to inquire about progress of the investigation. If dissatisfied, request to have a meeting to discuss the situation further or ask to speak to a supervisor. You may be the only hope for this animal. His life could depend on you.

DogsAggressionFight_45097721_original.jpg

Dog Fighting Hotline

Dog fighting is a particularly heinous kind of cruelty- it cant not be tolerated. Do not look away if you know of any of these fights are being organized.

  • The Dog Fighting Hotline 1-877-847-4787 is sponsored by the Humane Society of the United States.
  • The line is answered 24/7.
  • You can receive an award of up to $5,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of a dogfighter.
  • All information is kept confidential.
  • You can leave a message, talk to an investigator, or get their e-mail address and leave your own.
  • If a dogfight is in progress, immediately call the police, 9-1-1. Then call the hotline.

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How Did Your Senator Vote: Alaska's Arctic Refuge Defense

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How Did Your Senator Vote: Alaska's Arctic Refuge Defense

Thank your senator for defending wilderness in Alaska's Arctic Refuge

Listed under the Endangered Species Act, polar bears give birth to their cubs in the Arctic Refuge.
 

Some in Congress hope to take advantage of a pro-drilling president and Republican control of the House and Senate by opening the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil drilling.

Oil development would permanently scar this unique landscape. Time and time again we have seen the results of the damage done by greedy oil companies and irresponsible legislators.  The damage done by the Exxon Valdez is still visible, decades later. 

This week, 40 senators ran to the refuge’s rescue and co-sponsored a bill to permanently protect the coastal plain of the Arctic Refuge as designated wilderness.

Is your senator is on the list of Arctic Refuge champions?

 

  • CA – Sen. Dianne Feinstein and Sen. Kamala Harris
  • CO – Sen. Michael Bennet
  • CT – Sen. Richard Blumenthal and Sen. Chris Murphy
  • DE – Sen. Tom Carper
  • FL – Sen. Bill Nelson
  • HI – Sen. Mazie Hirono
  • IL – Sen. Dick Durbin and Sen. Tammy Duckworth
  • MA – Sen. Ed Markey and Sen. Elizabeth Warren
  • MD – Sen. Christopher Van Hollen and Sen. Ben Cardin
  • MI – Sen. Gary Peters and Sen. Debbie Stabenow
  • MO – Sen. Claire McCaskill
  • MN – Sen. Al Franken and Sen. Amy Klobuchar
  • MT – Sen. Jon Tester
  • NV – Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto
  • NH – Sen. Maggie Hassan and Sen. Jeanne Shaheen
  • NJ – Sen. Cory Booker and Sen. Bob Menendez
  • NM – Sen. Tom Udall and Sen. Martin Heinrich
  • NY – Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand and Sen. Chuck Schumer
  • OH – Sen. Sherrod Brown
  • OR – Sen. Ron Wyden and Sen. Jeff Merkley
  • PA – Sen. Bob Casey Jr.
  • RI – Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse and Sen. Jack Reed
  • VT – Sen. Patrick Leahy and Sen. Bernie Sanders
  • WA – Sen. Marie Cantwell and Sen. Patty Murray
  • WI – Sen. Tammy Baldwin

Encourage your Arctic champions to keep up the fight by sending a thank you letter to your senator/s.

Thank you. 

Which of your senators is FOR this kind of environmental rape?  Let them know how you feel. 

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Horse Rescue: 2106 Lousiana Flood-The Painful Truth

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Horse Rescue: 2106 Lousiana Flood-The Painful Truth

Louisiana floods: Horses, pets left stranded

 

By Chelsea Brasted, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

  • August 15, 2016 at 4:56 PM,
  • updated August 22, 2016 at 12:43 PM

With thousands of residents displaced across East Baton Rouge Parish and throughout Acadiana by the Louisiana Flood of 2016, there are countless pets and animals likewise in need of supplies and shelter. 

Some of those pets landed at the Lamar Dixon Expo Center, which is serving as a shelter for thousands of people. Its stalls and rodeo area are now filled with horses, dogs and other animals displaced by the flood. 

Jodie Summers, a volunteer who's helping to manage a Facebook page for coordinating relief efforts, told NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune photographer Chris Granger that she and others are in desperate need of help and donations. 

"We had to quit (after) 24 hours yesterday on rescues because our own area is starting to flood. We are running out of stalls. We are running out of hay. We are running out of feed," she said. 

Summers said there were too many horses and not enough time to count them all at Lamar Dixon, making the need for supplies and volunteers dire.

"We need help. Some of them are past saving," she said of the horses still to be rescued. "If you can bring me buckets and hay, that's the main thing on our priority list."

Hurricane Katrina changed the way that animals are treated during emergencies thanks to the passage of the Pets Evacuation and Transportation Standards. In its approval, Congress compelled first responders to save pets just as they save their people. 


This situation is tough to hear for any pet owner and animal lover; I can't imagine how tragic it will be for those owners to return home and face that loss.

Don't simply watch and shake your head, prepare for yourself and your animal family, just in case. 

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9 Tips for Protecting Your Horses in a Wildfire

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9 Tips for Protecting Your Horses in a Wildfire

Horse owners in wildfire danger zones know that the call for evacuation can come at any time.

Colorado’s Carrie Terroux-Barrett helped coordinate rescue and evacuation efforts during the state’s 2015 massive wildfires. She says during the 2013 Black Forrest Fire more than 500 horses were evacuated.

Terroux-Barrett offers these tips to horse owners dealing with wildfires.

1. Ensure you horse knows how to step right onto the trailer and stand tied to make evacuation time a breeze.

Evacuations are not the time for a trailer loading practice session.

These mules did not want to get on the trailer with their buddy during a Colorado fire, but when the trailer left, so did they.

These mules did not want to get on the trailer with their buddy during a Colorado fire, but when the trailer left, so did they.

2. Take at least one bale of hay and a bucket for each horse you are evacuating.

3.  Have a first aid kit pre-made and ready in your trailer.

If you need to evacuate, chances are you may feel the affects of the thick black smoke. Take rags and plenty of fresh water for yourself and the horses in case of traffic jams on the evacuation route.

4.  Make sure you have your proof of ownership documents for your horses.

For some that may include brand inspection papers, a Bill of Sale, coggins, registration, microchip info, photos, and insurance documentation or some combination of those mentioned.  ( Check this out: Documents)

5. If you are unable to take your horses, turn them loose, without a halter on.

Close all barn doors so they can’t get back in.

6. If you turn your horses loose, write your phone number on them.

Use spray paint or shoe polish on the horses’ bodies. You can also write your number on their hooves, although it might smear.

Terroux-Barrett says she prefers a ribbon in the mane or tail for the phone number, over putting it on the hooves. If the ribbon gets caught on something it pulls out easily.

7. Nothing plastic, like fly masks, should be left on your horses — plastic melts.

8. If you take your horses to an evacuation center, have your horses marked in some way.

Sometimes even the evacuation centers have to evacuate.

9. If your horse is in a large pasture area, cut or remove the fence’s corners and leave the gates open.

When horses can’t find their way in the smoke they will follow the fence lines.

 

Having a plan and being ready to implement that plan is the first step in getting you and your horses out of danger’s way safely.

Know Your Risk:

Click here

Be ready to be ready; your horses depend on you. 

 

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Georgia Dog Lovers: We Need Your Help

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Georgia Dog Lovers: We Need Your Help

HB 313:

NEW BILL WOULD DISCOURAGE DOG ADOPTIONS IF PASSED

House Bill 313 will soon cross the desks of Georgia representatives that, if passed, would discourage dog adoptions by requiring that every rescue organization, shelter, or individual rehoming certain breeds to also provide potential adopters with paperwork and statistics on dog bite frequency and litigation costs during a transfer of ownership – whether it be through sale, adoption, or gift – even when the dog being adopted has never bitten anyone.

More Breed Specific Discrimination

The bill, filed by District 60 Georgia Representative Keisha Waites (D), specifically names the usual breeds included in breed-specific legislation (American Pit Bull Terrier, American Staffordshire Terrier, American Bulldog, Staffordshire Bull Terrier, Doberman Pinscher, Rottweiler, Akita, and wolf hybrid breeds), but also includes several breeds less commonly affected by BSL including the German Shepherd, Chow Chow, Husky, Great Dane, and Boxer breeds and mixes.

It would require the dog’s current owner or guardian to provide, upon transfer of ownership of the animal, the following data to the new owner:

  • any statistics pertaining to injuries to humans caused by dogs which it deems relevant to inform the public of the risks related to dog bites
  • data from the previous year regarding the reported number of humans bitten by dogs in the United States;
  • data on the total medical costs related to injuries caused by dogs in the United States
  • the total amount of damages awarded to victims of dog bites or dog attacks in the United States

The bill, nicknamed “Logan’s Law” was drafted in response to a recent attack in which a young Atlanta boy named Logan was killed by a pit bull on his way to the bus stop. The bill was written under the guise of increasing public safety, but those who oppose the bill believe that, not only would a bill already in place not have prevented the attack on Logan, it would not prevent future attacks from occurring.

Further, the bill places unnecessary burden on rescue organizations, forcing them to provide potential adopters with information that is both already readily available and is irrelevant in individual adoptions, sales, or transfers of dog ownership.

And, further complicated by the passing of the bill would be rescue efforts when any of the named breeds, or mixes of those breeds are involved. For example, would a rescuer be permitted to remove an animal from an abusive situation, or will he need to wait for the abuser to provide irrelevant dog bite statistics first?

This is an Ignorant and Useless Bill: Please contact your representative and tell them NO. 

If passed, the bill will take effect on July 1, 2017. The bill has been assigned to the House Agriculture Committee. It will need to pass through the House, get a vote on the House floor, pass the Senate Committee, and a vote on the Senate floor before the Governor would consider signing it into law.

The legislation, would not only discourage pet adoptions, but would complicate rescue efforts and make it even more difficult for dog owners needing to rehome animals to do so – all without any conceivable benefit to public safety.

They deserve a fair chance, just like any other breed. This would be a bad law.  

They deserve a fair chance, just like any other breed. This would be a bad law.  

If you live in Georgia, please contact your representatives (click here!) and urge them to vote NO on House Bill 313.

Thank you for not accepting breed discrimination that will put more animals in shelters and that will be killed. This is not a solution. 

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Pets & Domestic Abuse Protection Bill

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Pets & Domestic Abuse Protection Bill

Congress Introduces Bill to Help Victims of Domestic Violence and Their Pets

 

Animal cruelty and domestic violence are often linked—and when pets become pawns in domestic disputes, victims can delay seeking help and remain in dangerous environments because they fear for the safety of the pets they are forced to leave behind.

We are pleased to report a strong bipartisan leadership team in the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate has come together to introduce important legislation that would provide new federal protections to domestic violence victims and protect their pets from the hands of abusers.

The Pet and Women Safety (PAWS) Act would prohibit abusers from crossing state lines to harm a domestic partner’s pet, and adds veterinary care to the list of restitution costs to be recovered by victims. It would also authorize much-needed federal grant funding to provide assistance and housing to victims’ pets in need of emergency shelter. Despite an urgent need, currently only 3% of domestic violence shelters nationwide are able to accommodate victims’ pets. 

The new federal protections offered by the PAWS Act would help victims and their pets escape abusive environments and seek the safety and shelter they need. Thirty-two states, as well as the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico, have already passed laws allowing pets to be included in protective orders.

Representatives:

  • Katherine Clark (D-MA),

  • Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-FL),

  • Rick Nolan (D-MN),

  • Mimi Walters (R-CA),

  • Steve Cohen (D-TN) and

  • Jeff Denham (R-CA)  

Senators:

  • Gary Peters (D-MI)

  • Dean Heller (R-NV)

are reintroducing the PAWS Act in the 115th Congress.

We are thankful for their strong leadership in taking this important step in the fight against animal cruelty and domestic violence.

We need your help! Please visit the ASPCA Advocacy Center today to encourage your U.S. representative and senators to help victims of domestic violence and their pets by cosponsoring the PAWS Act. 

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FAQ's: Rescue of Animals In A Natural Disaster ALDF

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FAQ's: Rescue of Animals In A Natural Disaster ALDF

As we all know, Hurricane Katrina revealed gaps in the rescue programs for pets during a natural disaster.

As a result, the PETS act was signed in 2006, which includes provisions for care of pets in the future. 

The PETS Act amends the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act to ensure that State and local emergency preparedness operational plans address the needs of individuals with household pets and service animals following a major disaster or emergency.

The PETS Act authorizes FEMA to provide rescue, care, shelter, and essential needs for individuals with household pets and service animals, and to the household pets and animals themselves following a major disaster or emergency.

While the PETS act addresses federal issues, there are practical questions  for local responders that need to be answered immediately. The questions and answers listed below are specific to Louisiana and Mississippi; what the laws allow will be specific to your state. 

They give a clear picture into the on-the-ground permissions and discretion of law enforcement, animal control enforcement and veterinarians in these extreme circumstances. 

BACKGROUND

This Frequently Asked Questions (“FAQs”) project was designed to help address the legal questions generated by animal rescuers and animal shelters assisting with the recovery of animals affected by Hurricane Katrina in September of 2005.

It was initiated and produced by the Animal Legal Defense Fund and the American Bar Association’s Tort, Trial and Insurance Practice Section’s Animal Law Committee. Volunteer attorneys from across the U.S. donated their time to, as quickly as possible, research and write the legal memoranda that support the short answers provided here.

Attorneys and others who would like to read the full memoranda prepared for any one or all of the questions may send your request to ALDF at action1@aldf.org. 

Don’t see the answer to your animal rescue legal question here?

Then you or your organization can submit a question to action1@aldf.org and we will have a volunteer attorney research it and provide you with an answer if possible.

We may also post your answer as part of these FAQs. (Don’t forget to include information on how to contact you to get you your answer!) We expect that as the hurricane season wears on, these FAQs will continue to grow, so keep watching this space.

DISCLAIMER:

While ALDF makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of the information presented here and throughout its website at aldf.org, ALDF does not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of such information. The information contained here is provided as general information only and is not intended, nor shall be construed, as specific legal advice. Only a licensed attorney can provide legal advice. Use of any information on aldf.org is strictly voluntary and any reliance on it should be undertaken only after an independent review by qualified experts. ALDF is not responsible for, and expressly disclaims all liability for, damages arising out of the use of any information contained on this website.

Questions:

1a. What actions may police or other government authorities take during a natural disaster to control dangerous or potentially dangerous dogs—i.e., can they shoot or otherwise harm them?

Dangerous dogs may be killed, humanely, without liability for money damages or criminal prosecution. In Louisiana, see La. R.S. § 3:2773(D) and La. Atty Gen. Op. No. 1993-808; 1994. In Mississippi, see Miss. Code Ann. § 41-53-11 (2005) Also, generally, see 56 A.L.R. 2d 1024 § 1(b).

1b. Is anyone besides government officials permitted to take such action?

In Louisiana, sheriffs, constables, or other police officers, as well as citizens, may take such action. In Mississippi, only sheriffs, conservation officers, or peace officers may take such action. See the laws referenced above in question 1a.

1c. Does it make a difference if the dangerous animal is a companion animal, wildlife, or other type of animal?

The states’ legislation refers only to dogs.

1d. What actions may be taken to control loose, but not dangerous dogs?

Answer is still being developed and will appear here shortly.

1e. What if there is a perceived risk that some or all loose animals may endanger public health and safety?

  • How is this determined?
  • What measures may be taken by government agencies and/or others to secure the public's health and safety generally, if the threat is not aggressiveness, but animals' rabies or communicable diseases?

Killing animals with communicable diseases is usually considered a proper exercise of a state’s police power. U.S. and state case law tells us that, at least in normal circumstances, there must be first a series of steps taken to test or inspect the animals to confirm the existence of the disease and to provide notice and a hearing to the animals’ guardian before the animal(s) may be destroyed.

In Louisiana, the State Livestock Sanitary Board has the power to make and enforce rules necessary to prevent, control, and eradicate contagious and infectious diseases of animals, and all other animal diseases. See La. R.S. § 3:2095.

Mississippi requires sheriffs, conservation officers or peace officers to kill dogs over the age of 3 months found running loose who bear no collar or tag showing they are unvaccinated against rabies. See Miss. Code Ann. §§ 41-53-1 et seq.

2a. What legal rights, responsibilities, and immunities exist, if any, for Louisiana and Mississippi licensed veterinarians (vets) in an emergency such as the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina?

In Louisiana, 2 laws address this question: The Good Samaritan Law reads that state licensed vets who in good faith provide emergency services to an animal at the scene of an emergency shall not be liable for damages for providing, or failing to provide, for the emergency care or arrangement of further vet medical treatment. See La. R.S. § 37:1731(C).

The Louisiana Health Emergency Powers Act requires vets to report all cases of animals who harbor any illness that may cause a public health emergency to the office of public health, infectious disease epidemiology section. See La. R.S. § 29:765(A)(1)(a) See also question 2e below.

Mississippi law is still being researched on this question.

2b. What legal rights, responsibilities, and immunities exist, if any, for veterinarians (vets) licensed in other states who come to Louisiana and Mississippi to help there?

Louisiana prohibits persons from practicing veterinary medicine in the state if they are not licensed there, unless they are licensed in another state and are consulting with a licensed Louisiana vet. See La. R.S. § 37:1514. That said, for purposes of the current emergency, that rule appears to be temporarily suspended pursuant to the following documents and Vet Board memo: Louisiana (La. R.S. § 29:751) has adopted the Southern Regional Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness Management Assistance Compact, which includes the following: Article V - Licenses and Permits Whenever any person holds a license, certificate or other permit issued by any party state to the compact evidencing the meeting of qualifications for professional, mechanical, or other skills, and when such assistance is requested by the receiving party state, such person shall be deemed licensed, certified, or permitted by the state requesting assistance to render aid involving such skill to meet a declared emergency or disaster, subject to such limitations and conditions as the governor of the requesting state may prescribe by executive order or otherwise.

A nearly identical provision exists in the Interstate Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Compact. See La. R.S. § 29:733: Article 4. Whenever any person holds a license, certificate, or other permit issued by any state evidencing the meeting of qualifications for professional, mechanical, or other skills, such person may render aid involving such skill in any party state to meet an emergency or disaster and such state shall give due recognition to such license, certificate, or other permit as if issued in the state in which aid is rendered.

In relation to the above, our researchers obtained the following memo from the Louisiana Veterinary Medicine Board, which is reprinted in full here:

Veterinary Medicine Board Hurricane Katrina Aftermath – Relief Assistance

Memo DATE: September 12, 2005

FROM: Louisiana Board of Veterinary Medicine

RE: Hurricane Katrina Aftermath – Relief Assistance Due to the effects of Hurricane Katrina, Governor Blanco issued an Executive Order, KBB 05-35, (effective through September 25, 2005) suspending the requirement for a Louisiana issued licensed to those out of state licensed veterinarians, in good standing, in other states.

Accordingly:

A. A veterinarian not licensed in Louisiana, but currently licensed, in good standing, in another state may practice veterinary medicine if: 1. the veterinarian has photo identification and license to verify a current licensure in another state, and properly registers with the LA Board;

2. the veterinarian is engaged in a legitimate relief effort during the emergency period (at what disaster facility are you intending to practice in Louisiana, and please keep the Board office current on this information); and 3. the veterinarian must practice in good faith, and within the reasonable scope of his skills, training, and ability.

B. The authority provided for in this shall cease on September 25, 2005, unless the Executive Order is renewed, modified, or extended, or earlier rescinded by the Governor.

C. All out of state licensed veterinarians shall submit a copy of their respective licenses and photograph identification, as well as other requested information, to the LA Board of Veterinary Medicine office at lbvm@eatel.net, 225-342-2176, or fax 225-342-2142, for registration with this agency.

Application Form in pdf format. http://www.lsbvm.org/DVM_app_temp_relief.pdf Use the Text Select tool to complete the form online and then print for signatures. Completed applications must be in original form – faxed copies not accepted.

Mississippi’s laws permit several categories of persons to practice veterinary medicine there without Application Form in pdf format. http://www.lsbvm.org/DVM_app_temp_relief.pdf Use the Text Select tool to complete the form online and then print for signatures. Completed applications must be in original form – faxed copies not accepted.

Mississippi’s laws permit several categories of persons to practice veterinary medicine there without having Mississippi-issued veterinary licenses, including: Any member in good standing of another licensed or regulated profession within any state, or any member of an organization or group approved by the board, providing assistance requested by a veterinarian licensed in the state, acting with informed consent from the client, and acting under the direct or indirect supervision and control of the licensed veterinarian. Providing assistance involves hands-on active participation in the treatment and care of the patient. The licensed veterinarian shall maintain responsibility for the veterinarian-client-patient relationship." Miss. Code. Ann. § 73-39-

61(e). Any veterinarian employed by an accredited college of veterinary medicine providing assistance requested by a veterinarian licensed in the state, acting with informed consent from the client, and acting under the direct or indirect supervision and control of the licensed veterinarian. Providing assistance involves hands-on active participation in the treatment and care of the patient. The licensed veterinarian shall maintain responsibility for the veterinarian-client-patient relationship… Miss. Code. Ann. § 73-39-61(f). Any person who, without expectation of compensation, provides emergency veterinary care in an emergency disaster situation. Miss. Code. Ann. § 73-39-61(p). See also question 2e below.

Mississippi has apparently not adopted either the Southern Regional Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness Management Assistance Compact or the Interstate Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Compact, as we could find no mention of either one in the statutes.

2c. What are the limits, if any, on the types of medical treatments that may be performed on rescued animals—only those necessary to save life? What about spay and neuter procedures?

We could find no express limitations set out in the laws or cases of either Louisiana or Mississippi. As noted in question 2a above, Louisiana does have a Good Samaritan Law found at La. R.S. § 37:1731(C), that would arguably shield from liability any emergency procedures performed in good faith.

2d. Is there a time where the answer to above question 2c changes—i.e., during the holding period for when animals may be reclaimed?

  • What about after that?
  • At what point does the holding period start?
  • Is the holding period different during a declared emergency?

As noted in question 2c above, the answer appears to be that there is no limit regarding the administration of medical treatment, no matter when it occurs. Louisiana's Abandoned Animals Act, La. R.S. § 3:2451, states that an animal is abandoned if veterinary charges (medical and/or boarding) are not paid within 10 days of the services rendered, La. R.S. § 3:2452, and after notice is given to the guardian, the animal can be disposed of an additional 10 days later. La. R.S. § 3:2453.

Mississippi's veterinary statutes state that an animal placed in a vet's custody is considered abandoned if not claimed after 10 days, see Miss. Code. Ann. § 73-39- 89(1) Although no exception to these provisions seems to exist, principals of equity would no doubt dictate that 10 days is an insufficient period of time to locate a companion animal in the aftermath of a natural disaster.

2e. Aside from the laws, what do the American Veterinary Medical Association, Louisiana and Mississippi State Veterinarians, and state vet requirements say, if anything, about vets assisting with these types of rescue situations and the above questions?

The AVMA has a detailed Disaster Preparedness and Response Guide at: http://www.avma.org/disaster. It includes a document about the Veterinary Medical Assistance Teams (VMATs), which were in fact sent into the hurricane-devastated area.

VMATs are funded through the American Veterinary Medical Foundation (AVMF), which is a 501(c)(3). The AVMA contributes to this foundation. Once VMATs respond to a disaster, their people who are participating become employees of FEMA. The Louisiana Board of Veterinary Medicine, as noted above in question 2b, has created an application form for out-of-state vets to be temporarily licensed to come in and help.

See the Louisiana Veterinary Medical Association's homepage with several hurricane links at http://www.lvma.org/, also their animal evacuation and recovery plan at http://lvma.org/evacuationplan.html.

Our Mississippi researchers contacted the Mississippi Veterinary Medical Association, which stated that they have no independent regulations governing their vets, only the MS Veterinary Practice Act found at Miss Code Ann. §§ 73-39-51 et seq., pertinent provisions of which are alr

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Pet Insurance Not Pay? Check Before you Buy

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Pet Insurance Not Pay? Check Before you Buy

The Fine Print:

To me this is the best weapon of the insurance companies to NOT do what they say they will: cover the costs of vet bills. What is important to remember, their first goal is profit, not insurance. so decisions and choices made by the company are made through the lens of the company's needs, not yours or your pets. 

I do think Pet Insurance can be a good idea; as with all insurances, READ THE FINE PRINT. They bury the nasty stuff in there, the clauses and excuses to take your premiums yet deny coverage. 

For instance: Does yours exclude normal behavior?

Pet insurance, like most forms of insurance, definitely qualifies as a “Buyer Beware” purchase.

The Hard Way

Jamie Richardson found that out the hard way when her seven-year old dog Muddy tore a ligament in his leg and her insurance company Petsecure refused to cover his veterinary care. One reason for denying the claim was that Muddy was running when he hurt himself. Specifically, he was happily running through the woods, which can also be described as “being a dog”.

Unfortunately for Richardson, “being a dog” is essentially excluded in her accident policy. The fine print states that any injury sustained while the dog is “jumping, running, slipping, tripping or playing” is not covered.

Additionally, any accident that the guardian does not witness is not covered. In Muddy’s case, even if he had torn his ligament in full view of Richardson while he was, say, eating his dinner, none of the $4,200 in veterinary costs would have been reimbursed by the insurance company due to a “pre-existing condition” clause that relates to arthritis or degenerative joint issues.

Though X-rays at the time of surgery showed no signs of arthritis, the fact that the presence of bone spurs had been noted in Muddy’s medical records allows the insurance company to deny the claim. That’s true even though the surgeon said that the accident was not caused by arthritis and the veterinarian pointed out that those bones spurs are normal for seven-year old dogs, and minor to boot. Two vets saying no pre-existing conditions are present does not prevent the insurance company from denying the claim based on the “pre-existing condition” clause.

Richardson has cancelled her policy, since it did her no good at all. She borrowed money to pay her bills, and is now saving a little each month just in case Muddy has another accident or an illness that requires expensive veterinary care. She continues to let him be a dog, though, and he still runs through the woods near her home in Yukon.

What To Do?

Pet insurance can be a good idea, you have to do your homework and look for the escape clauses in the coverage (that's them escaping paying you). 
Read EVERY word of the policy. 

  1. Pre-existing condition clause, even if unrelated to the incident?
  2. Limitations of coverage?
  3. Which vets will they pay or how do they determine how much they will compensate you?
  4. Be suspicious of any language or wording that seems obscure or unclear- it is not likely to be in your best interests.  
  • Check reviews of the company online from a few sources. 
    http://www.petinsurancereview.com/
     
  • Consider what things you are most concerned about for your pet and insurance: accident, injury, illness. 
     
  • Vet bills can be ridiculously expensive and most of us simply hand over the credit card in a crisis. Insurance can seem as a good fall back, but as the story above illustrates, it can end up being a black hole, sucking money time and rage as they do not provide the coverage you anticipated. 

     
dogfineprint.jpg

Its awful when something happens to our pets and money is such a big part of care for them. Be smart, be aware and be careful. 

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Basic Dog Training Tips: Beth Adlrich

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Basic Dog Training Tips: Beth Adlrich

January 27, 2017

By Beth Aldrich from Monument Dog Training

January is National Train Your Dog Month!  With this; many people may be examining their own dog to see if training is needed.  There is a wide range of training out there and you can go from obedience champion level on down to basics that could be life saving.  The numbers of dogs euthanized each year due to behavior issues is staggering and more than any other health issue COMBINED.  Behavior wellness is just as important as your yearly check up with your Vet. 

A few things all dogs should do on command reliably and under distraction.

1) Sit

Having a reliable sit command can make your dog less of a target to other dogs and sets you as the owner up to be in control of any situation that requires your dog to be under command and not asserting itself into a space; for example in a vets office or waiting in line at your local pet shop.

2) Crate  

This means you can crate your dog when you are at home or away and have them be in the same calm mental and safe physical state that they were in when they entered the crate.  If your dog has severe separation or crate anxiety this can lead to other behavior issues in and out of the home.  You need to seek the help of a professional.

3) Heel  

This means your dog can walk calmly without pulling by your side through distractions and other dogs.  Most all leash reactivity aggression lunging so on and so forth begins behaviorally by tension being applied to the leash and harness or collar mechanism at the wrong time.  Constant pressure or tension on the lead is a sure fire way to escalate any situation from goo to bad or bad to worse and is completely preventable by teaching a reliable heel command.

4) Come

In the dog park or after your dog has made a quick escape from the car, house or leash it can be crucial to call your dog back to you on command.  This is not simple and takes practice and diligence but in the end could end up saving your dogs life.  The reality is if your dog does not come back on command your dog should NEVER be off lead.  This includes an open dog park that is fenced in.  So go ahead and put that practice in with a professional and teach your dog this life saving skill.

If you need help accomplishing these basics or just want to have a more behaviorally balanced dog please do not hesitate in contacting a professional. 

If you would like to visit my website it is monumentdogtraining.com

 

Happy Training!

Beth

http://www.howltothechief.com/

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Be A Savior: Animal Rescue Corps Training Tennessee

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Be A Savior: Animal Rescue Corps Training Tennessee

Please join the experienced Animal Rescue Corps team for two days of practical training and information on the structure of emergency response and the invaluable knowledge and skills necessary to aid animals in natural disasters, large-scale cruelty cases and many other situations.

 

BARC Level 1

Learn the structure and processes of large-scale animal rescue and skills to help animals in many situations.

Topics include:  basic animal body language and handling, identifying veterinary emergencies, basic triage, evidence intake, emergency sheltering, and more.

 

BARC Level 2:  

ARC's advanced level course, which expands on the BARC 1 curriculum and covers new rescue topics and skills. 

Completion of BARC Level 1 is a prerequisite for this course.

 Topics include:  anti-cruelty laws, investigations, advanced handling, behavior assessments, animal portrait photography, and more.

 

When:

BARC Level 1:  9 a.m. - 5 p.m. on Saturday, March 11th, 2017

BARC Level 2:  9 a.m. - 5 p.m. on Sunday, March 12th, 2017

The courses begin promptly at 9 a.m. so please arrive by 8:30 to sign-in and take your seat.

Where:  The Great Hall and Conference Center

1900 South Germantown, Rd.

Germantown, TN  38138

How much:

  1. $125 for either course, early registration through March 8th.
  2. $220 if registering for both courses, through March 8th.
  3. $150 at the door, if space is available.

Seats are limited, so please register early.


 Lunch:  Vegan lunch and refreshments will be provided.

 

 

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Evacuation Failure

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Evacuation Failure

Hurricane Rita left this question: If a successful emergency evacuation involves 100-mile highway backups, motorists running out of gas and water, widespread road rage and the death of 23 seniors in a freak bus accident, what would a failure look like?


Rita showed that evacuating a sprawling metro area is at best slow and difficult, and that sometimes an evacuation can rival its cause as a source of misery.

What if the noble concept of saving lives and protecting people and pets from an incoming disaster ended up being a failure in real life?

We preach to be ready to care for yourselves, your loved ones and especially on this site, your animals. Ok, so you've done that, have a communications plan and emergency supplies. It's time to go, everyone is in the car and on the road...........and so did everybody else.

During Hurricane Rita in Texas   2005: 

  • Solie Jimenez left the Houston suburb of Pasadena at 4 a.m. Thursday with her 6-year-old daughter and 3-year-old son heading for Lufkin, more than 100 miles northeast. But 24 hours later, they were still in their car — and still not out of Houston.
     
  • Ozan Patterson, a dialysis patient and stroke victim, needed supplementary oxygen 24 hours a day. Patterson's daughter Lorraine Nelson, drove her father from his home in Port Arthur, Texas, to a cousin's house in Austin. They were stuck in traffic from 11 p.m. Wednesday until 2:30 p.m. Thursday. Her father ran out of bottled oxygen. There was nothing they could do except keep the air (conditioning) burning as high as they could. Lorraine called ahead from Houston to set up dialysis treatment for Friday afternoon. He survived, but it was pretty scary. 
     
  • Danny Hart, 37, co-owner of a restaurant-nightclub in Galveston, fled Wednesday and spent 12 hours on the road. His wife, who left earlier, made the same trip in four hours; his partner, who left later, spent 24 hours traveling 60 miles. 

In densely populated places, the roads are crammed, no gas, no bathroom!, no food or water. The kids are fussy, the dog is whining and you are just stuck. WTF? You have done everything right, and now you are stuck. Are you any closer to safety? 

There are always those who don't or won't leave- for lots of reasons. That is their choice and risk. But what about those who want to escape and find the ways out packed or not working?

What would you do?

I live in West Los Angeles where traffic density is a blood sport on a good day. Add crisis, panic and everyone having the the same idea at the same time; it is recipe for sheer misery and not necessarily rescue.

A study* of a community that was ordered on evacuate in the face of a flood revealed some interesting facts:

  • Overall, 19.4% of households did NOT evacuate.
  • Households with children had a much lower evacuation failure rate vs ones with no kids. 
  • Households with pets had a much higher evacuation failure rate vs ones with no pets. 
  • Households with kids and pets were a little better at evacuation; households with only pets failed to evacuate at a higher rate. 
     

Bottom line: the largest group that decided NOT to evacuate were those with pets and no kids. 

The reasons those households gave as why they chose to stay:

  1. Having many pets.
  2. Having outdoor dogs and other pets. 
  3. Not having carriers or supplies, especially with cat owners. 

What does this mean to you? 

Prepare, plan, get ready.  

Spend a few minutes assembling what you would need if you had to save yourself and your pets. Start with the basics: food, water, leash/carrier.  Make a stash for the house of some extra food and water out of reach of every day. 

Think about where you might go and how you might get there. How long would it take you to get Fluffy and Snowflake and Killer out of the house? 

And what if getting out of the house put you in even more peril? Have supplies at home just in case the effort at rescue is worse that staying home.

 

 

*American Journal of Epidemiology 2001;153:659-65

http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/nation/2005-09-25-evacuation-cover_x.htm

 

 

 

 

 

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Sacramento, Yolo & Placer County Alerts: Sign Up NOW

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Sacramento, Yolo & Placer County Alerts: Sign Up NOW

www.sacramento-alert.org     

     www.placer-alert.org

www.placer-alert.org

 

All public safety agencies in Sacramento, Yolo, and Placer counties have partnered to have a state of the art community notification system to alert residents about emergency events and other important public safety information.  

This system enables us to provide you with critical information quickly in a variety of situations, such as severe weather, unexpected road closures, missing persons and evacuations of buildings or neighborhoods.

You opt-in to enter your contact information and subscribe to notifications that you care about based on your location. The information you provide is protected and will not be used for any other purpose.

How It Works

  • When we issue a notification about a potential safety hazard or concern, you will receive a message on the voice or text communication methods that you have registered.
     

  • If requested for the notification, you can confirm that you have received the message and you will not be contacted by any subsequent methods regarding that particular notification.
     

  • If you do not confirm, the system will continue to attempt to reach you at all of the contact paths that you have registered.

Sign up for Notifications

Create an account and add your contact and location information into the Emergency Notification System. All information you provide will be kept strictly confidential.

Stop Receiving Notifications

You can stop receiving at any time by removing your contact information from your profile.

 

Don't have an account? 

 

FAQs

Emergency Notification System: Frequently Asked Questions

 

What is the Emergency Notification System?

 

This service allows you to opt-in to receive notifications via phone calls, text messaging, e-mail and more based on locations you care about. You can choose to receive notifications about events that may affect your home, workplace, family's schools and more.

 

When will it be used?

 

This system will be used to notify you about imminent threats to health and safety as well as informational notifications that affect your locations or work environments. Administrators will send notifications regarding severe weather, flooding, gas leaks, police activity and more.

 

Will I still get emergency notifications if I don't sign up?

 

If you don't create a username and password, you will receive notifications only by the methods that are on file for your Organization.

 

What if my phone number or email address changes?

 

The system is only as good as the information you provide. If your contact information changes, you can always visit your profile and update your information.

 

Will my contact information be shared with others?

 

No. The information that you provide will be used only for this Organization for notification purposes. We will not give or sell your contact or location information to any vendor or other organization.

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List of So Cal Emergency Pet Assistance

With a singed mane and slightly burnt nose, this horse was one of the lucky ones from San Diego. 

With a singed mane and slightly burnt nose, this horse was one of the lucky ones from San Diego. 

The National Interagency Fire Center tracks the latest information on the wildfires, including breakdown by county, acreage burned, percentage contained and street closures. For more information, click here.

For a list of animal disaster groups serving California, click here.

The Santa Barbara County Animal Services Program has implemented a hotline to assist pet owners with evacuation and sheltering for the Sedgewick fire. For details, click here.

The San Diego Humane Society and SPCA have gathered the latest information on animal evacuations and locations that accept pets in the area. For details, click here.

The Equestrian Coalition of Orange County is updating areas of evacuation and locations where horses may be brought for shelter. For more information, click here.

The American Kennel Club and the California Federation of Dog Clubs have joined forces to collect and distribute food to evacuated pets. For more information, or to make donation, click here.

PetSmart Charities providing food, crates, litter, beds, medical supplies and vaccinations for pets affected by the California wildfires. To make a donation, click here.

The Petco Foundation is collecting donations through Nov. 3 at its stores to provide pet supplies for animals displaced by the wildfires. The organization is also accepting donations via mail. For details, click here.

Brown Dog Foundation is providing assistance to those with pets who were displaced by the San Diego fires. To make a donation, apply for a grant or volunteer, click here.

The San Diego Animal Support Foundation has livestock trailers, locations that can house livestock and foster families available to take pets in. For more information, click here.

The Oasis Sanctuary is reaching out to bird owners who need a place to bring their birds. For details, click here or call (520) 212-4737.

The New Leash on Life ranch is housing dogs displaced by the wildfires and are in need of volunteers. For more information, click here.

The Lily Sanctuary is assisting those who need help finding a location to keep their parrots. For more information, click here.

Iams Established a Wildfire Hotline. Pet health professionals will answer cat owner inquires regarding the California wildfires. Call (800) 508-9275 or click here for more information.

PetSmart Charities dispatched two trailers containing pet products, food and supplies to San Diego’s Qualcomm Stadium. The nonprofit organization is also raising funds to be distributed to organizations serving the areas most affected. To make a donation, visit the Petsmart Charities website.

The American Veterinary Medical Association is assisting veterinarians who have been affected by the wildfires and providing grants to those who provide veterinary service to animals in need of care. For details, click here.

The California Veterinary Medical Association is seeking donations for its disaster relief efforts. For more information, click here.

For those in need of pet-friendly accommodations, Motel 6 accepts pets. For details or to reserve a room, click here.

For those affected by the wildfires, Pet Friendly Travel has compiled a list of 25 hotels in San Diego County that accept pets. For hotel details, click here.

Craig’s List has created a special fire forum complete with shelter and housing information, discussion boards, lost pet postings, volunteer opportunities, a next-of-kin registry and more. Click here.

The International Bird Rescue Research Center is providing temporary shelter for birds displaced by the wildfire. For details, click here

The San Diego Humane Society and SPCA have gathered the latest information on animal evacuations and locations that accept pets. The organization is also in need of horse supplies, such as hay, halters, lead ropes and portable corrals. For details or to donate, click here

The San Diego County Department of Animal Services is coordinating all animal information. For information on how to gain access to pets in burn areas of San Diego County, click here.

For suggestions and tips for donating to a pet-related charity, click here.

To see all of CatChannel's California wildfire updates for cat owners, click here.

 

 

 

 

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